Category Archives: walking

PS21 Report on Place-Making in Portsmouth

According to participants in a PS21 workshop, inexpensive measures like better seating, food trucks, planned activities, better lighting and basic landscaping could transform under-utilized spaces in downtown Portsmouth and enhance popular locations.

More than 40 citizens took part in ‘walkability audit’ and ‘place-making’ workshop in late October that focused on four downtown Portsmouth locations:

  • Vaughan Mall
  • Fat Belly Square (aka Market and Hanover streets)
  • Market Square
  • State Street (main between the Unitarian Church and Fleet Street)

Participants asked: Were the places welcoming, cooperative and neighborly? Did they have vital uses and enjoyable activities? Were the locations walkable, convenient and accessible? Were they safe, clean and attractive?

Ideas from the brainstorming session and the ‘place-making’ principles that informed it are summarized in a newly released report from PS21 (Portsmouth Smart Growth for the 21st Century) and Jane Lafleur, the workshop leader from the organization Lift360.

READ THE REPORT: PLACE-MAKING PORTSMOUTH

The workshop, which followed a showing of the classic film on place-making, “The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces,” generated dozens of ideas for enhancing downtown locations. PS21 plans a public session in January to discuss ideas.

ADU Ordinance Heads to City Council

An ordinance allowing accessory dwelling units (ADUs), as required by a recently passed state law, goes to the Portsmouth City Council on Dec. 5. The proposed ordinance can found on PlanPortsmouth.com.

For a primer on ADUs, see Accessory Dwelling Units: What they are and why people build them?

Season Sponsors: Piscataqua Savings Bank, Coruway Film Institute
Event Partners: 3S Artspace, City of Portsmouth, Seacoast Media Group, The Sound

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ABOUT PS21: Portsmouth Smart Growth for the 21st Century presents ideas and encourages discussion and policy development around planning issues in Portsmouthh, N.H. and the Seacoast. Our goal is to support a vibrant, sustainable, livable, and walkable community compatible withthe principles of smart growth, the historic nature of Portsmouth, and the context of the 21st century. PS21 maintains a blog and e-newsletter at www.ps21.info, and archives video recordings of many events

Jeff Speck suggests ways to a more walkable Portsmouth

Jeff Speck Portsmouth NH
Walking Congress Street with Jeff Speck

Renowned urban planner Jeff Speck gave a provocative, idea-filled (and often funny) presentation and workshop in Portsmouth Jan. 22 and Jan. 23. Around 200 people came to the presentation 60 to the workshop. Speck talked about how cities work   and suggested ways  that Portsmouth can become more liveable and successful  through ‘walkability.’

Watch on YouTube:

Read about Jeff Speck’s ideas in The Sound.

Portsmouth Herald: ‘Councilors intrigued by planner’s vision for the city

speck_presentation
Before a full house at Seacoast Repertory Theatre on Thursday, Jan. 22

 

Did you attend? Fill out our 3-question survey.

Primary funding for this event was provided by the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation and the City of Portsmouth, with additional support from Esther’s Marina, Piscataqua Savings Bank,  and PortsmouthNH.com.

Seacoast Local featured the event as a partner in their “Making the Connection” speaker series. Seacoast Media Group was media sponsor.  Many local businesses and individuals also contributed.

Bike-Ped Plan Adopted; Projects in the Pipeline

Portsmouth’s Planning Board has adopted a voluminous and detailed master plan for the city’s bicycle and pedestrian future. The long-term goal is to create a largely unbroken network of safe and useful bike paths and pedestrian walkways throughout the city.

The plan includes programs to be initiated (such as for bike safety), and more than 200 specific infrastructure changes (large PDF). Changes include revamped intersections, new bike paths, updated sidewalks and more.

Juliet Walker, city transportation planner, described some the first projects that will be undertaken.

Continue reading Bike-Ped Plan Adopted; Projects in the Pipeline

Bike-Ped Plan Envisions a Car-Free Market Street

Map showing Market Street
Downtown Changes: The thick green line indicates bike-ped only; green lines indicates a shared street; purple lines show widened sidewalks; orange circles with black lines indicate new geometry for an intersection.

A draft version of Portsmouth’s Bike-Pedestrian Master Plan presented to the Planning Board Thursday, July 17, envisions making a portion of Market Street — between Bow Street and Market Square — for bikes and pedestrians only.

The plan from Toole Design Group (which did Boston’s bike-ped plan) and city staff also recommends dozens of intersection changes and:

  • Wider sidewalks and parallel parking (instead of angled parking)  around Market Square
  • A “contraflow” bike lane and one lane for motor vehicles for a short section of State Street
  • A bike-ped system including a long path parallel to Islington Street, along the railroad tracks

The suggested changes can most-easily be seen on a wikimap, which allows comment but requires registration.

The Planning Board is entertaining public comment on the plan, including on the wikimap, through the end of July. The master plan will be considered for adoption in August.

 

Shuttle Parking Used to Max on Market Square Day

The CCC parking was full to overflowing on Market Square Day.
The CCC parking was full to overflowing on Market Square Day.

The jury may be out on the overall effectiveness of Portsmouth’s free parking shuttle, but one thing’s for sure: It can be successful for special events like Market Square Day.

On Saturday, June 14 the CCC parking lot on Market Street was full,  and additional cars were parked along access roads. The shuttle stops at the lot every 10 minutes, but some people were not waiting, deciding instead to walk the half mile to downtown.

Progress on the Bike-Ped Master Plan

An impressively detailed draft version of Portsmouth’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan was unveiled during a session June 5 at the public library. (Watch video)

With perhaps 75 people looking on, city officials and Toole Design Group, a planning firm that specializes and bicycle and pedestrian planning (and was the consultant for Boston’s bike-pedestrian master plan) described techniques for improving walkability and bikeability and displayed about about a dozen maps on the Levenson Room’s walls. The maps showed where people walk and bike today, where there are opportunities for improvement, and where there are constraints on making improvements.  (For a short while, more public input can be added to the city’s Bike-Ped Wikimap.)

Fully implemented, the plan could result a sophisticated walk-bike network for the city. However, absent a sudden infusion of cash, bike-ped improvements will evolve slowly. City planner Juliet Walker and the Toole Design Group plan to rank potential projects by their importance for safety, availability of funding, ease of implementation, public enthusiasm and other factors.

Many of of the master plan materials are available on the the city’s PlanPortsmouth.com website.